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Introducing the 2017 Kiev Fellows

Congratulations to our two 2017 Kiev Fellows who will be starting their research in the Kiev Judaica Collection in the spring semester. The biennial Kiev Judaica Collection Fellowship Program provides an award for short-term scholarly research, creative, or educational projects informed by the holdings of the I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection. These awardees will present their work at the end of the fellowship in an open event for the community. 

Melanie Meyers is a senior manager for reference and outreach at The Center for Jewish History. She will use materials in the Kiev Collection that were both stamped by the Nazi confiscation stamp, and may also have passed through the Offenbach Depot, in her research on looted books and libraries during WWII and it’s aftermath. Her project traces the path of books from their original repositories through the sorting point of the Offenbach Archival Depot, where they were either returned to their origin libraries, or sent to alternate institutions. Her team at The Center for Jewish History have spent years creating and maintaining a digital map of these libraries, which they hope to expand with additional educational resources developed during this fellowship. 

Garrett Dome is a GW sophomore majoring in philosophy. His project will examine the writings of Maimonides in both the context of Jewish history and philosophy, focusing on the Moreh Nevukhim, otherwise known as The Guide for the Perplexed, which contains Maimonides most essential philosophical writings. He will use a copy of Maimonides’ Guide translated by Samuel ibn Tibbon, which is available in the Kiev Collection. Working with a translator, Garrett will focus on Tibbon's translation from 1204 as a way to understand the nuances and complexity of Maimonides’ language. 

 

 

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