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Estelle and Melvin Gelman LibraryEckles Library at the Mount Vernon CampusVirginia Science and Technology Campus Library
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Eckles Library will be closed Monday, May 23 through Monday, May 30 (Memorial Day). We apologize for any inconvenience caused by this closure. If you need research assistance, please contact the Gelman Library Ask Us Desk. If you have questions about checking out or renewing books or about accessing books from other schools, please contact the Gelman Library Check Out Desk at (202) 944-6840. 

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Memorial Day

Gelman and Eckles will be closed Sunday, May 29, and Monday, May 30 in observance of Memorial Day.

Gelman will close at 6 pm on Saturday, May 28 and reopen at 7am on Tuesday, May 31.

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GWU GraduatesCongratulations to all of our 2016 graduates!  After all this time together the libraries wouldn't abandon you to a libraryless existence.  Here are a few of the resources available to you as a GW alumni.

Access to Gelman
GW Alumni can present their valid GWorld Alumni ID card for access to Gelman Library.  For information about how to obtain your Alumni ID card, see the GWorld 2.0 Alumni ID Card web page.

Borrowing Privileges
Borrowing privileges are extended to GW Alumni for $50 per year.  Payments should be made at the Circulation Desk in Gelman Library.  For more information see details about Alumni borrowing privileges.

Selected E-Resources
Thanks to the the generous support of the GW Alumni Association, GW Libraries offer access to selected E-resources, including ABI/Inform CompleteProquest Research Library, and JSTOR Archive.  Visit the E-Resources for Alumni page for more information. 

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Summer Hours24-hour access to Gelman Library is not available during the summer, but all of our online resources are available 24-hours a day to our current students, faculty and staff. Gelman will resume 24-hour access at the beginning of the Fall semester.  

 
 

Summer Hours*
Monday - Friday
7 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Saturday & Sunday
Noon - 6 p.m.

*Closed May 29 & 30 for Memorial Day and July 3 & 4 for Independence Day.

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In 1959, National Education Association Regional Vice-President Allan M. West visited the Soviet Union to evaluate its educational system. He was only one of 7000 US citizens to visit the communist country that year. He made the trip so he could evaluate first-hand the Soviet educational system. The NEA Collection, housed in Gelman Library's Special Collections, contains records and photographs from that trip. Here we see some schoolchildren posing for the camera.

Russian Schoolchildren

Unfortunately, the pictures have no context, so we do not know which city these were taken in. The files do include a daily itinerary of West's travels, which included Poland before travelling to the Ukraine and then on to Russia proper. Along the way he was able to interview education officials and individual teachers, to get a sense of what the life was like for a teacher in the USSR. On October 9, he arrived in Moscow and photographed Red Square. You can see more photos here.

Red SquareHe had a chance to visit with officials of the Soviet Union's Trade Union of Education, Higher Education and Scientific Establishments. From this meeting, reports on statistics and anecdotes of daily life for teachers in the USSR were produced. From this report, we learn that teachers were paid 10 rubles a day, and received a 10% raise every five years. The entire enrollment is Russia in 1959 was 31,500,000 students. Most striking was that teachers in the country taught classes in 66 different languages, 40 of which were not written languages.

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