Estelle and Melvin Gelman LibraryEckles Library at the Mount Vernon CampusVirginia Science and Technology Campus Library
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News and Events

Student Town Hall on the Future of the LibrariesTuesday, February 3
Noon -or- 5:30pm
Gelman, Room 219

What will the GW Libraries look like in 2020?  How are we preparing now for the students of the future?

Join us for a student town hall on the future of the GW Libraries.  This meeting will unveil the libraries' new Strategic Plan, our road map for the future.  Bring us your feedback into how the libraries can be better for you and for the students to come.

RSVP by January 31st for a free lunch or dinner from Chipotle at the meeting.  Only those who rsvp are guaranteed a burrito.

RSVP for the Noon-1pm meeting: go.gwu.edu/LibraryChipotleLunch
RSVP for the 5:30-6:30pm meeting: go.gwu.edu/LibraryChipotleDinner

Are you interested in 3d printing at Gelman?Are you interested in access to a 3D printer on campus? We are asking students, faculty and staff at GW to tell us if and how they might use a 3D printer for academic purposes. Should the libraries purchase a 3D printer for student/faculty use? Take our survey and help decide!

The Realities of Reality TV: A Talk with the Writers Guild of America, EastThursday, January 29 from 4-6pm
Gelman Library, Room 702
 
In reality television, hundreds of hours of footage are shot for a single episode. The resulting story is similar in its narrative structure to an episode of scripted television. Reality TV programs have a beginning, middle, and end, complete with character arcs, plots, conflict, and resolution. The difference between shows like Modern Family and Survivor is how the source material is generated. Reality writers don’t script each line for a professional actor to speak. Instead, these writers must use existing footage to work backwards from the ending in the most interesting way possible.

While reality television shows have quickly become popular with viewers and profitable for the networks, the writers who make these programs possible have not shared in the success. Unlike other television writers, most reality television programs are written without a union contract. As a result, these writers sometimes work long hours without health and pension benefits or minimum salary protections or residuals.

Non-Fiction Television Writers and Producers United, a project of the Writers Guild of America, East, is currently organizing those performing storytelling duties on non-fiction/reality TV shows in New York.  Justin Molito, Director of Organizing for the WGA-East and non-fiction television writer and producer Joe Danisi, will discuss the realities of the non-fiction television industry in a panel moderated by GW Labor Archivist, Tom Connors. 

See the librarian you want when you want

Making a research appointment is now easier than ever with our new scheduling system.  You choose the librarian and you choose the time—whether today or in 2 weeks. Schedule your appointment in real time—no more emails or waiting for confirmation.  This system also makes it easy to cancel or rescehdule an appointment you've made.  Make an appointment today at go.gwu.edu/ResearchHelp.  

How to schedule an appointment:

1) Go to  go.gwu.edu/ResearchHelp, set up an account (1st time only), and log in.   

2) Choose a librarian.  If you don't know who you should see, most librarians can help you get started in any topic. More information about each librarian and their expertise is available in the appointment pop-up and on the Reference Directory

3) Look beside the librarian's name.  You'll notice some names are followed by a specialty or a location other than Gelman Library. Make sure you choose wisely.

4) Choose a time by clicking once on a white block of time.  Appointments must be scheduled in 60 minute blocks.

If you need an appointment on Saturday or Sunday, please send us an e-mail at refdesk@gwu.edu and we will do our best to accommodate your request.

 

Discover the World through GISWould your data make more sense shown on a map?  Do you need to statistically analyze data over space?  

ArcGIS is a geographic information system system (GIS) that allows people to collect, organize, manage, analyze, communicate, and distribute geographic information.  Now you can learn and use this powerful software at Gelman Library! ArcGIS is available on all Gelman PCs (not Macs) and GIS specialist Kean McDermott is here to help you use it.  

Kean McDermott, GIS Specialist
email: keanmcd@gwu.edu
make an appointment: go.gwu.edu/ResearchHelp 
Ask for Kean during daytime hours at the Ask Us Desk

Digital Humanities Showcase

February 20, 2015
12:30pm
Gelman Library, Room 702

Hosted by GW Digital Humanities Institute & GW Libraries

Are you launching a Digital Humanities (DH) project and figuring out the next steps? Do you want to meet other people in GW who are interested in how the arts and humanities interact with digital media?

We invite members of the GW community to join a DH Showcase at Gelman Library. Each person (or team) will present a DH project or endeavor (in any stage of its production). This event will provide a venue to introduce your project to other people and receive feedback or advice while also making connections with people across GW community who might share similar interests. We hope that new conversations will open up about methods, tools, challenges, questions, and possibilities arising across projects.

Our definition of DH is broad and can entail anything from a database or tool to a blog or creative work, and we welcome presentations integrating online media or digital cultures into teaching in (or beyond) the space of the classroom.

If you are interested in taking part in this event, please contact Prof. Jonathan Hsy (Co-Director of the Digital Humanities Institute) at jhsy at gwu dot edu with your name, email, affiliation/title, and title of project(s) by January 20, 2015. 

Lit Review How To: Holiday Boot CampsAre you a graduate student working on a literature review for a thesis or dissertation?  Get serious about your scholarship by attending these 30-minute workshops to learn tips that will save you time and sanity.  Our "Boot Camps" on Martin Luther King's Birthday and President's Day offer several popular workshops together - attend one or all.

All sessions will take place in Gelman Library, Room 301-302.  Please bring your own computer.  Kids off school? Quiet and happily occupied offspring are welcome.

Monday, January 19 (MLK's Birthday) & Monday, February 16 (President's Day):
9:30-10:00: Citation Chasing
10:00-10:30:  Citation Management
10:45-11:15:  Staying Current in One's Field
11:15-11:45: Searching Beyond Gelman

Citation Chasing
How do you build on someone else's research?  How do you find the research they used?  Chase down those citations like a pro with tips from librarian Tolonda Henderson.

Citation Management
Once you've done all that research how do you keep track of it?  Step away from the notecards and learn about online citation tools like Refworks, Zotero and Mendeley. Librarian David Ettinger will help you find the tool that is right for you and get you started using it.

Staying Current in One's Field
Librarian Ann Brown will help you find out how to stay current in your field. You'll learn how to set up journal table of contents alerts, search alerts, and identify key journals in your field.

Searching Beyond Gelman
How do you know what research is out there?  How can you know what you don't know?  Librarian David Killian will help you be sure with a comprehensive search of all published book literature using Worldcat.  This workshop is best for disciplines that write books, especially the humanities and social sciences.

An Exquisite FutureMonday, January 12
11am–Noon
Gelman Library, Room 219

The Corcoran School of the Arts and Design and the Art and the Book program cordially invite you to the launch of An Exquisite Future, the fifth annual collaborative artist’s book by Art and the Book graduate students. Please join us!

An Exquisite Future explores the implications of a future with a reduced population of honeybees. A vital pollinator of many types of food plants for humans and animals, honeybees are in danger of disappearing because of colony collapse disorder. The artists used this phenomenon as a starting point for contemplating the future. Each artist responded to the preceding vision, building on what came before and using humor while considering potential difficulties.

Gelman Library Winter Hours

Monday January 5 - Friday January 9: 8am -7pm

Saturday January 10 & Sunday January 11: noon - 6pm

Monday, January 12:  
Open at 7am and 24-hour access resumes. 

Please note: The University Writing Center will be closed December 13th through  January 24th.

Paris Summer Study Abroad

Summer Study Abroad: TRDA 4595w

Professor Mary Buckley & Librarian Bill Gillis
June 3-16, 2015

Paris-City of Lights, City of Love, Cultural Capital, Moveable Feast: Earnest Hemingway wrote to a friend, "If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then where ever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast."  Study abroad in Paris this summer and enjoy the feast.  This course, now in its 10th year, will explore the journey of Picasso, Diaghilev, Kertesz, Stravinsky, and others who forged artistic collaborations and established Paris as the center of Modernist thought in the early 20th century.  Visiting museums, touring iconic architectural sites and viewing contemporary performance spaces, today's art will be measured against the past.

Learn more at www.studyabroad.gwu.edu or www.gwuparis.com and contact Mary Buckley (buckley@gwu.edu) or Bill Gillis (gillis@gwu.edu).

No language requirements: 3 credits, WID, Elliot School and Cultural Studies Course Humanities GCR

Price: $5250.76 (tuition, lodging, demi-board, cultural events and museum entrances included.  Airfare is not included.)

 

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