Estelle and Melvin Gelman LibraryEckles Library at the Mount Vernon CampusVirginia Science and Technology Campus Library
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News and Events

Closed July 3 & 4Gelman, Eckles, and the Virginia Campus of Science and Technology (VSTCL) Libraries will be closed on Friday, July 3 and Saturday, July 4 to celebrate the Independence Day holiday.

Gelman will reopen at noon on Sunday, July 5. Eckles & VSTCL will reopen on Monday, July 6.

lockersWe are upgrading the 5th floor Graduate Student Reading Room for Fall!  Based on graduate student feedback the long-neglected lockers hidden away on the first floor (pictured) are moving upstairs. The current bank of lockers, located near the west end of the first floor, will soon be dismantled.  If you are using one of these lockers, please remove your personal lock as well as the contents of the locker before July 6, 2015. After July 6, remaining locks will be cut off and the contents of each locker will be sent to GW UPD's central Lost & Found.

Check back as the summer progresses for photos of the Graduate Student Reading Room improvements.
 

 

Power OutageDue to a power outage, Eckles Library is open and operating on generator electricity only. The latest estimate from PEPCO is that power will not be restored today.

Eckles will remain open as long as possible, but there is no air conditioning in the building. Five public computer workstations are available and patrons may still check out books.  The 24-hour computer lab remains fully operational.  All CI activites scheduled inside Eckles are being moved to other locations on the Mount Vernon Campus.

 

Summer HoursGelman Library's building hours have changed.  Please note the new hours below.

Gelman Library Summer II Hours*
(June 27 – August 30) 

Monday- Friday           8am - 8pm
Saturday & Sunday     Noon – 6pm

*Closed July 3 & 4 for Independence Day and August 23 for Intersession weekend.

24-hour access to Gelman Library is not available during the summer, but all of our online resources are available 24 hours a day to our current students, faculty and staff.

 

Have you ever wondered what it takes to preserve a collection, make it findable, and make it available to the public? Recent GW graduate Liz Settoducato is spending her summer as a processing assistant for the District of Columbia Africana Archives Project (DCAAP), funded by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) .  She has written about her experiences in processing the papers of Geneva K. Valentine. You can read more on dcaap.tumblr.com/.

DCAAP is a partnership between Gelman's Special Collections Research Center, GW's Africana Studies Program, and five archives throughout the city. It's mission is to enhance access to previously unavailable research materials that document the history of the African diaspora in DC, the civil rights movements, the struggle for Home Rule, the rise of Black-owned businesses, the development of Howard University, slavery in the nation’s capital, jazz music in DC, and the literary arts.

Okinawa Collection

On Tuesday, June 2, Okinawa Gov. Takeshi Onaga was the guest of honor at an opening reception for the Okinawa Collection at Global Resources Center (GRC).  The collection is a collaboration between government of Okinawa and GW Libraries with the Okinawan government agreeing to fund the ongoing development of the collection and a part-time Japanese language research librarian.  

The Okinawa Collection of primary and secondary research materials is housed in the GRC's Japan Resource Center. Its focus is Okinawan politics, policy, international relations, economics, culture, literature, linguistics and history.

Mike Mochizuki, associate professor of political science and international affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs, has helped develop the collection. He says the Okinawa Collection’s books, digital databases and video materials will contribute enormously to teaching and research and will strengthen the Japanese-language holdings in the JRC.  “With this grant, GW’s Okinawa Collection could become the second largest library on Okinawa located outside of Japan after the one in the University of Hawaii,” Dr. Mochizuki said.  “To have this collection in the nation’s capital at GW gives unparalleled access to researchers and decision-makers in the think tank and policy community. We are delighted to have these materials.” 

CIGelman Library will help to welcome the Class of 2019 by hosting the Academic Experience at Colonial Inauguration (CI). Expect increased noise and visitors on the entrance floor from 3:30–5pm on Tuesday, June 30.

Gelman will also be the site for CCAS registration for during CI. All public computers on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd floor -and- study carrels on the 3rd floor will be reserved for registering students from 8–10:30am on Wednesday, July 1.

GW Writing CenterThe GW Writing Center is open this summer to provide dedicated attention to your writing and research projects!  

Writing Center Summer Hours (June 3 - August 13 )
Tuesday: 3-8pm
Wednesday: Noon-6pm
Thursday: Noon-6pm

Appointments are not required but recommended. You can schedule an appointment online.

 

Memorial Day

Gelman, Eckles, and the Virginia Science & Technology Campus Libraries will be closed Sunday, May 24, and Monday, May 25 in observance of Memorial Day.

Gelman will close at 11pm on Saturday, May 23 and reopen at 8am on Tuesday, May 26.

Eckles and the Virginia Science & Technology Campus Libraries will close at 5pm on Friday, May 22 and reopen at 9am on Tuesday, May 26.

The George Washington University Libraries are pleased to introduce the Professor Ahmad Mahdavi Damghani Collection on Islamic Studies to the Global Resources Center as part of the Middle East and North Africa Research Center (MENA).
 
The Professor Ahmad Mahdavi Damghani Collection on Islamic Studies is one of the largest Arabic/Persian collections of Shi‘I and Sunni foundational sources on Islamic law, jurisprudence, theology and exegesis in the United States. This is the first step in collection building for the newly established Master’s degree program in Islamic Studies at the Religion department.
 
Faculty advocated strongly for the addition due to the University's growing focus on the Islamic world and the role religion and culture play in shaping long-term dynamics in the region. The collection will directly support the new MA program in Islamic Studies, as well as related interdisciplinary research rooted in the study of policy, culture, and society. All 4000 books are on our shelves, though they are not currently available to check out. 

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