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News and Events

Diversity at GWMonday, April 20
2:30-4pm
Gelman Library, Room 702
Refreshments to follow 

Please join us for a presentation by the three recipients of the 2014-2015 University Archives Diversity Research Fellowships. The students will discuss their research into the history of religious communities on campus, GW’s LGBTQ community, and the effect of the 1960s Chicano movement on the curriculum and student body at GW. Student fellows have spent many hours digging deep into the University Archives and interviewing individuals with stories to share. Learn more about the unique histories of these groups and how their experiences have shaped our present day GW community. 

This program is generously funded by an Innovation in Diversity and Inclusion grant from the GW Office of Diversity and Inclusion. 

GW IT outage tonightWednesday, October 22 (tonight)
2:00 - 5:00 a.m.

The GW Division of Information Technology (IT) will be conducting emergency maintenance on the university data centers tonight.  There will be intermittent technology service outages between 2-5am.  The following library services will be affected:

Campus WIFI & wired internet will be unavailable
No ability to log into library computers (mac & pc)
Colonial Printing will be unavailable
No ability to log into GW email

Other affected services are: GW webpages, Enterprise Accounting System (EAS), myGW portal, GWorld, 4-Ride, iBuy and other dependent services.

For questions or to report any problems, please contact the Division of IT at 202-994-GWIT (4948), ithelp@gwu.edu or IT.GWU.EDU. Technology assistance is available through the IT Support Center 24 hours a day.

 

Will Turkish Soap Operas Change the World?Hosted by: Heather Schell, Assistant Professor of Writing

Wednesday, October 29
5pm
Gelman Library, Room 214*

KISMET
Wildly popular at home, Turkish soap operas have taken the world by storm, and KISMET delves into this phenomenon, exploring how the serials captivate, inspire and empower women. The film reveals how the soaps impact and break down negative stereotypes and traditional taboos, openly discussing rape, sexual and domestic violence, child and arranged marriages, and honor killings while also sparking change in gender relationships, activism against sexual abuse, and a wave of divorce across the Middle East. KISMET discloses how profoundly Turkish soaps penetrate viewers’ social and religious realities while empowering and helping women to transform their lives and strengthen the debate about women’s rights across the region.

A film by Nina Maria Paschalidou
Greece/Cyprus, 2013, 57 minutes
Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsQALTV4FzI

*Please note that space is limited for this event.  Attendance is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Thursday, October 23
7pm
Gelman Library Room 702

Did you know that in 1969 forty members of Students for a Democratic Society seized GW's Maury Hall, home of the Sino-Soviet Institute, to protest University complicity with the Vietnam War?  Or that more than 2,000 students attended a rally in the University Yard opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee with speakers including Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoffman.

Find out more about the tradition of social activism at GW.  Join us for an intergenerational discussion sponsored by Lessons of the 60s, a project to document and archive local social justice organizing in Washington DC 1960-1975.  This event is a part of the “Traveling Hopefully” series.

The Library's Role in Academic Success: What Parents Need to KnowSaturday, October 18
11am -or- 1pm
Gelman Room 219

The modern library is so much more than just books and a place to study.  Learn from teaching librarians how innovative services of the GW Libraries enhance undergraduate success.  Find out about technology at Gelman - from scanning to statistics consulting and GIS - and how your students can learn these new and marketable skills.

Hear in DC: Vernacular Music in the Nation's CapitalThursday, October 16
2-5pm
Gelman Library, room 702
Free, no registration necessary

The DC Vernacular Music Archive at The George Washington University invites you to attend the opening exhibit and first annual symposium "Hear in DC: Vernacular Music in the Nation's Capital."

Covering bluegrass, folk, punk, and go-go music a panel of local artists and historians will discuss the homegrown music that makes Washington's cultural geography special. Moderated by Marc Eisenberg of the DC Music Salon, panelist include Andy Wallace, Ian MacKaye, Kevin Hammond, Kip Lornell, and Stephen Wade who will also perform. Following the symposium attendees are welcome to view the exhibit with items from Washington's influential music history.

Sleep in Peace TonightFriday, October 10 at 5:30pm
Gelman Library, Room 702

The George Washington University’s Gelman Library, future home of the National Churchill Library and Center, and the Washington DC area chapter of the Churchill Society invite you to attend the launch of Sleep in Peace Tonight, a novel by James MacManus about the harrowing days in 1941 when FDR sent Harry Hopkins to England, where Winston Churchill wooed him to gain American support for the beleaguered English war effort.

Sleep in Peace Tonight will be available for purchase at a reception following the reading and Mr. MacManus will sign. Light refreshments will be served.

 

Lit Review How ToAre you a graduate student working on a literature review for a thesis or dissertation?  Come to one or all of these 30-minute workshops to learn tips that will save you time and sanity.  All sessions will take place in Gelman Library, Room 219.  Please bring your own computer.

Citation Chasing
Tuesday, Oct. 21 at 5:30pm
How do you build on someone else's research?  How do you find the research they used?  Chase down those citations like a pro with tips from librarian Tolonda Henderson.

Dissertation and Theses Online
Thursday, Oct.16 at 5:30pm  
Monday, Oct. 20 at 5:30pm
 
Do you know what other people in your own department or under your own advisor have done? Do you want to see some of the most current research in your field?  Librarian David Ettinger will show you how to find dissertations and theses from GW and around the world. 

Searching Worldcat
Wednesday, Oct. 22 at 5:30pm  
Thursday, Oct. 23 at 5:30pm

How do you know what research is out there?  How can you know what you don't know?  Librarian David Killian will help you be sure with a comprehensive search of all published book literature using Worldcat.  This workshop is best for disciplines that write books, especially the humanities and social sciences.

Citation Management
Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 5:30pm
Once you've done all that research how do you keep track of it?  Step away from the notecards and learn about online citation tools like Refworks, Zotero and Mendeley. Librarian Dolsy Smith will help you find the tool that is right for you and get you started using it. 

Academic Freedom, Social Media, and the Neoliberal UniversityWednesday, October 1
3 pm
Gelman Library Room 702

Join GW Libraries for a panel discussion about academic freedom in the corporate culture of U.S. higher education, with panelists from a wide range of perspectives, who will engage with academic freedom claims and limitations nationally as well as the ways it impacts professors and the climate at GW. Recently, public debates about academic freedom have arisen on social media in the aftermath of the Salaita case at University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign and, closer to home, the former GW President Joel Trachtenberg's comments on sexual assault. Audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussion.

Panelists:
Zak Wolfe, Assistant Professor, University Writing Program
Melani McAlister, Chair, Department of American Studies; Associate Professor of American Studies, International Affairs, and Media & Public Affairs
Tracy Arwari, Case Manager, CARE Network, Division of Student Affairs

Researching PotterDid you read in the GW Hatchet article about the Researching Potter workshop and wish you had attended?  Read below for some information from librarian Tolonda Henderson about Harry Potter Studies and her tips for getting started researching popular culture.


One of the most basic ways we organize books is by fiction and non-fiction. My detective novels and sci-fi fantasy books live across my apartment from my textbooks from college and graduate school. The few pieces of fiction I have mixed in with the academic books are what most people would call Literature (with a capital L), and beloved books from childhood are kept in an entirely different room. The clarity of these distinctions, however, is slowly being turned on its head for me as I find myself wading deeper and deeper into the world of Harry Potter Studies.
I’ll take a moment to let that sink in.

Yes, I said Harry Potter Studies. On my desk here at work sit seven books for which the New York Times Book Review created a children’s best seller list. I keep the series within arm’s reach so I can refer to them as I research, for example, what the magical properties of photographs and portraits can tell us about our screen-oriented contemporary visual culture. This past February I gave a paper on the library at Hogwarts at a conference with a Harry Potter Studies Section. Next month, I will be giving a paper at the Harry Potter Conference at Chestnut Hill in Philadelphia It is entirely likely that my first scholarly publication will be about the world inhabited by The Boy Who Lived.

Would you like to add some Hogwarts to your academic experience?  Here are some tips.

  • Use multiple keywords when searching the catalog. If you just search for Harry Potter, you will get screen after screen of the Consortium’s holdings of the actual books and movies. Searching for “harry potter AND international relations” or “harry potter AND psychology” will return a much more focused list of results.
  • When searching a specialized database such as MLA International Bibliography, DO NOT limit your results to full text. Doing so would prevent you from learning about chapters in edited volumes. There are many such edited volumes on Harry Potter, but there are also individual chapters in volumes on other topics.
  • Pay attention to the date of publication. Scholars started writing about Harry Potter before the series was complete; depending on your topic, this can make a big difference. Articles or book chapters about Hogwarts as a school will be very different if they were written before the introduction of Dolores Umbridge in Order of the Phoenix than if they were written afterwards.

Please feel free to contact me directly. I am considering branching out in Popular Culture Studies to projects on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the Hunger Games, or the Divergent series. I would be happy to talk to you about any of my projects or, more importantly, about yours.

Tolonda Henderson
Instruction and Reference Librarian
Gelman Library
tolonda@gwu.edu

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