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© 2016 GW Libraries & Academic Innovation
Estelle and Melvin Gelman LibraryEckles Library at the Mount Vernon CampusVirginia Science and Technology Campus Library
Welcome to GW Libraries at the George Washington University, including the Gelman Library on the Foggy Bottom Campus, Eckles Library at Mount Vernon Campus, and the Virginia Science and Technology Campus Library. Part of GW Libraries & Academic Innovation.



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We want you to help us improve our website

We want to hear your thoughts about our website! The libraries are looking for GW undergraduates, graduate students, alumni, staff, and faculty to talk to us about how they use library.gwu.edu and help us to test out changes. Is there something you've had a hard time finding? Are you confused by something you've seen? Let us know so we can improve our website for everyone.

There are 2 ways to help:

  • Click here for a fast and easy way to give us feedback on anything and everything about the libraries' web presence.
  • Want to have an even greater impact? Come to Gelman and help us to do a usability test. As a participant, you'll show us where our website goes wrong and give your opinions on how to make it better. Partcipants will earn our eternal gratitude, a better library web experience for all, and a Starbuck’s Gift Card. Email Student Liaison Yesenia Yepez for more details or to sign up. 
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Quiet Study SpacesWondering where you can go for quiet study? Or where you can meet with a study group? Spaces throughout Gelman Library are designated for either quiet, individual study or collaborative, group study. Quiet spaces are designated with the "Quiet Study Space" posters so you'll know the guidelines for that space. Respecting the posted guidelines makes Gelman a better place for everyone!

Quiet Study Spaces in Gelman
No group conversation allowed • Use headphones at a low volume  • Silence phones & electronic devices

3rd, 4th, 5th & 6th floor stacks
4th floor large study room (401)
5th floor large study room (501)
Graduate Student Reading Room (503)
Andrew Oliver Reading Room (609)

Group Study Spaces in Gelman
Group conversation allowed • Use headphones at a low volume  • Silence phones & electronic devices

1st floor (all areas except National Churchill Library & Center 101)
Entrance floor (all areas)
4th floor large study room (403)
Reservable, small group, study rooms on floors 2,3,4,5 & 6 

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The Special Collections Research Center is pleased to invite applications to the biennial Kiev Judaica Collection Fellowship Program for the 2016-2017 academic year. 

The fellowship program provides an award for short-term scholarly research, creative, or educational projects informed by the holdings of the I. Edward Kiev Judaica Collection housed in the Kiev Room of the Gelman Library.  A summary of research or project report is required upon completion of the fellowship. Awardees are expected to present their work at the end of the fellowship in an open event for the GW libraries and community. 

We welcome traditional and nontraditional project proposals from all disciplines and backgrounds; including but not limited to Judaic and religious studies, history, history of the book and printing, librarianship, art, design, and cultural studies. Individual or group proposals are welcome. Special Collections Research Center curatorial and reference staff invite interested applicants to discuss potential projects. 

Senior fellows: Graduate and post-graduate researchers (non-GW applicants welcome)
Junior fellows: Undergraduate students (GWU only).

For more information or to find application requirements, please visit the Kiev Fellowship webpage. Contact the Special Collections Research Center with questions. Reviews of applications will begin on October 31, 2016.  Fellowships will begin in January 2017.

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Vision Magazine 2016We are proud to announce that the annual magazine of the GW Libraries, VISION, is now available in print and online.  

In this edition, we explore how the GW Libraries contribute to student and faculty scholarship through collaborations to create new software, build databases, perform statistical analyses, create 3-D models, manage and visualize their research data, and more. You can also find out how showcasing faculty scholarship, using the power of crowdsourcing to understand history, and providing a 24/7 "amazing space for students" are all part of the daily work of the GW Libraries.  

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The year was 1847 and slavery was legal in the District of Columbia, although it was the site of significant anti-slavery activism. Two enslaved men, known only as Abram and John, were owned by Capt. Haynes of Virginia and brought to Columbian College to assist him in his work as the college's steward. Columbian College student Henry J. Arnold provided Abram with $14 and a letter for an attorney with the intention that Abram would file a lawsuit to win his freedom. For this act of bravery, Arnold was expelled from the college. 
While the Arnold Case was not completely forgotten in the history of GW, it has remained largely obscure or else apocryphal to both scholars and the general public. Thanks to collaboration between DCAAP and the GW Libraries' digital services unit, the University Archives have now made available to scholars a cache of documents that illuminates this situation. The documentation consists of drafts and copies of letters written by Columbian College’s then-president, Joel S. Bacon, to Arnold, his family and others who inquired or appealed to Bacon about the matter. With this critical documentation, the story of enslaved people at Columbian College can now be more fully told.

Read more about this incident and the about the documents in a post by University Archivist Christie Peterson.


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